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by melanie eversley later. you probably heard what happened in pennsylvania regarding their voter i.d. law and we will talk to her about that. we also want to take time to let you know that on our other channels on the weekend, book- tv and american history tv, we look at cities across the united states. our focus this time around is augusta, maine. not only do you get a sense of meeting the people and learning about individual cities and what makes them interesting, here is a little bit of a preview from tonight's program. [video clip] >> this is the first parish church in brunswick, maine. it is significant to the story of a uncle tom's cabin. in many ways, the story began here. it is here in pew #23 that harriet beecher stowe, by her account, saw the vision of uncle tom being whipped to to death. he is the title character, the hero of her 1852 novel," uncle tom's cabin." the story is that there is -- there was a slave, a good slave, sold by his first kind owner, mr. shelby, and he sold him to pay debts on his plantation through a series of misadventures, you might say, he ends up in the
from the law. john: congress killing their funding. so acorn is gone except that they are not on. they just changed shapes. as dan epstein of the taxpayer watchdog group cause of action. what do you mean? >> my organization has been looking at acorn in is reprinted affiliate's of the past year, and we have seen that there are now 1704 groups out there, at least some of which including the mutual housing association of new york here in new york city are getting taxpayer dollars. yet we don't know if they're actually doing anything with that money. john: its new groups. not the same thing. >> the same directors, the same tax i.d. numbers, the same employee edification numbers. in many cases the same employees >> congress cuts them off and they just change names. >> i can tell you that when i were to the house oversight committee as an investigator we went to the inspector general's office, and an auditor told the committee staff when we found direct evidence of acorn housing misusing federal grant money, the auditor said, look, is $10 million. a $10 million grant. when you're deali
would do something like this. >> cnn legal contributor paul allen said alabama law may well come into play in this case down the road. >> alabama also has virtually the identical stand your ground law that florida has, so do you know that the officer in this case can probably say he was -- he felt that he was in danger of his life and he was standing his ground in shooting. so i'm betting as this proceeds, you may see that law that we've heard so much about in the zimmerman case in florida rear its ugly head in alabama. >> the officer involved in the shooting has been put on administrative leave until the investigation is complete. >>> now to pennsylvania where the state's deputy attorney general and his wife are accused of severely abusing two children they adopted. police arrested douglas and kristin barber after the kids had a doctor's visit. investigators say the doctor noticed several fractures on the 18-month-old girl's head, and the 6-year-old girl's appeared star. they were charged with endangerment. their attorney has not commented. >>> we know the meningitis outbreak ha
about out state." state."each helicopter cost bout 6-milliin-dollars. tonight, law eeforrement &pprofessionals from all over the country arr in bbltimore county for the battle of the badges basketball tournnment. year and is designed to raise to law enforcement officers. p his year the event is police ergeant gwen parish, the first africaa americaa woman whh joined the deeartment. the event'' founnee says baltimore was the perfeet spot for thhs year's i'm from baltimore, turner station is my .... oc: so phen have it here everybody cameeout, baltimore city police ave won baalimore city police have won the title history. their last chammionship was in 008. 3 orioles fans... are hoping... for... some more... of thatto's... tonight!the ... as we speak.../ for... a... &pdo-or-die game against the texas rangers...///. f... thee.. o's win.../ they'll .. yankeee.../ here.... for... game one... of the american but... iff.. they lose../ . that'll.... be the end... of their rare,.../ ppst-season stretch. ma
, a discussion about google operations and antitrust laws. >> almost 20 years ago, we broadcast one of the most controversial stories in our 44 years on the air. it was called yes, but is it art? i was accused of being a philistia, someone lacking the esthetic ability to appreciate contemporary art. in those 20 years, works that i question worth hundreds of thousands of dollars are now worth hundreds of millions. >> what made everybody so that 20 years ago? >> i discovered something that i had absolutely could barely believe -- that when you question someone's taste in art, thanmore personal politics, religion, sexual preference. it is something that goes to the very soul when you say you b ought that? > sunday at 8:00 on c-span's q&a. now, an american enterprise institute panel discussion examining whether google is violating antitrust laws. topics included the market for internet search, and an analysis of google's business model. pedal trade commission chairman john leibovitz has said that the ftc plans to make a decision on whether to take legal action against google by the end of this year
milwaukee and goes to stanford law school is becoming a clerk to supreme court justice robert jackson. tell us a little bit about how that came about, because i want to lead into what you unfold in here having to do with some of his conservativism on blacks and whites. >> guest: right, right. jackson was a, was, i think, seen by then even as a great justice. >> host: uh-huh. >> guest: and he had been the prosecutor at the nuremberg war trials. he'd actually taken time off from the court and gone to nuremberg and been the chief prosecutor and then come back to the court. and so rehnquist graduates from the stanford law school early at the end of 1952. he was, actually, in the class that would have graduated a semester later, but rehnquist finished his work. he was so smart -- >> host: yeah. >> guest: -- he got out early. so he wanted to, he -- it was clear when i was researching through his papers and looking at the diaries that he had actually, that were on deposit with his papers, which were fascinating. he had six notebooks that were filled with his reminiscences and his desires and early
in constitutional law. well, i'm here to say something about the argument of this book, which as you can have heard is called "i am the change." and the title is meant to bring out president obama's louis the xiv side. louis the xiv said -- i am the state. and mr. obama became very close in an press conference to saying i am the change. the title is actually from suggestion of my editor. and publishers, i had entertained another possibility, which was actually suggested to me my my friend bill. barack obama, what the hell were we thinking? [laughter] as opposed to some of my conservative colleagues and friends, i don't think we get very far by labeling president obama a socialist or by trying to trace his foreign origins or his secret muslim "devotions" nor i do think even that we greatly alumni nate things by to -- as my old friend argues in his movie and two books about obama. i think it's fairer to begin fairer and more useful in the end -- excuse me. to begin admitting president obama is what he call himself namely a progressive or a liberal. and the rest of the title is on barack obama and the
dubai which had 110-acre region that had its own legal system that imported british common law "by international financial center which resulted in billions of dollars of capital flowing in and one of the greatest financial centers in the world. john: sharia law. >> except for in the financial center where they realize that by importing bridges, they could actually attract international capital. there is no way they could attract billions of dollars in specifically financial capital in the financial restitutions. so simply very practical and took the best legal system in which to do business, financial business. honduras was going to have the best kind of legal system for creating businesses of all sorts john: you're going to use texas law? >> we are proposing to the perspective under and governor that a default texas legal system without u.s. federal law is pretty good law. most american business people respect and feel comfortable with texas commercial law. many hondurans felt comfortable. separate. the red -- they have to figure out where that is, but it's a good brand globally
and kelly stand on, a constitutional law attorney. welcome to you both. fred, i'm going to start with you. you might think that the court should rule in favor of the university of texas, which is fighting to keep these racial preferences. why is that? >> well, i'm not advocating one decision or another. if you look at supreme court questioning going back to 2000 and three race can be a factor in determining admission. in this case, i think for the university of texas, the majority of the students at the university of texas at intercampus if they are in the top 10% of their graduating class because of the way that the schools are set up. that leads to diversity. gerri: okay, all right, maybe. let's talk to kelly. you just said that justice should be blind and there may be more effective ways of getting some balance and student body than having the government come in and order that it do so. how is that? >> well, you know there are scenes that are considered socioeconomic. therefore, they are in different schools and university of texas has advocated that this is to help middle and upper cl
individuals who would rather work for those kinds of things that for hedge funds. or go to big law firms who are only going to help hedge funds in order to do it. we've really in the last 32 of 40 years in the united states have created great legal precedent. now we need to get somebody to start applying it. [applause] >> good evening. i am a graduate of as a new law school. i have my professor. >> looking. >> i want to say that i am the american dream. back came more than 25 years ago to the united states of america. and did not have one ballot in my pocket. i had two kids with me in another one in my belly. i went to smu. i raised my. [indiscernible] and the same time. the first one graduated from as a new law school. the second from harvard law school. smu. the second from harvard. the third one from airports academy. this is the glory of united states of america. [applause] also, i came from a communist romania. i leave half of my life in of free land, and i live half of my life under government control. what you presented today, it's not only dangerous for women because this last point
in battleground states about who gets to vote and how. all morning with we are putting the voter i.d. laws in focus. gang member or home grown terrorist. that is the question in one case. legal editor paul callan breaks it down. >> that is a bunk of malarky. >> debate politics and the eu has a nobel peace prize. we will look at the week that was. turn an entrepreneur's drea. ♪ into a scooter that talks to the cloud? whatever your business challenge, dell has the technology and services to help you solve it. thor's couture gets the most rewards of any small business credit card. your boa! [ garth ] thor's small business earns double miles on every purchase, every day! ahh, the new fabrics, put it on my spark card. [ garth ] why settle for less? the spiked heels are working. wait! [ garth ] great businesses deserve the most rewards! [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. choose unlimited rewards with double miles or 2% cash back on every purchase, every day! what's in your wallet? [ cheers and applause ] see life in the best light. [music] transitions® lenses automat
panels and between the patient and doctor. that is something i do not agree with in our health-care law. that's one of the reasons i oppose it. these are times we have to look at what is best for everyone to have the best kind of health care they can have. i believe in preventive health care and let me just address one thing before -- let me digress for a second. i have never said i'm for privatizing social security or our medicare plans. that's clearly not my thing. congressman murphy knows that has to be honest about that. i will support continuing reform to social security and medicare simply prolong it for our generation. congressman murphy voted to take $716 billion of medicare to fund the affordable health care act. i don't think that is what we should do. we're there for than going to eventually did i those services to our seniors or hospitals or doctors who are going to take medicare patients. . it is being taken out of the pockets of drug industries and drug companies who are making billions of care for seniors. if you are going to be serious about reducing the rate of growth o
at the school of law since january 1986. she teaches and writes in the area of evidence, constitution law, and women in the law. professor has been named to the mesh law institute and recognized one of the texas top women lawyers. and i also would like to introduce ken lambrecht president and chief executive off of planted parenthood. they are the largest reproductive health care provider in the state and one of the largest in the nation. it's networking of health certainlies merge this fall and they now serve central and north texas including austin, dallas, forth worth, tyler, and waco. planted parenthood have -- each year. planned parenthood in 2005 and brings more than twenty years of leadership experience in the health care industry. finally that brings us our keynote speaker tonight. most of us remember the moment that sandra she testified about seven months ago on the importance of requiring insurance plans to cover con stray seption. the remarks through the radio talk show host rush limbaugh who called her names. but maybe that isn't -- what isn't well known is that mrs. fluke dev
of massachusetts. while he lowered the tax burden on the people from one of the highest to one of the law were in the united states. that is a major sense of achievement and i admire that and i'm just delighted to be on the ticket with him. governor dukakis and i agree that we ought to have a trade policy for this country. but we've seen this administration more than double the national debt, that they've moved this country from the number one lender nation in the world to the number one destination in the world under their administration. they have not had a faith policy committee of let trade be a handmaiden for the policy objectives of the country. that this country has exported to many jobs and not enough profits. and as i work to pass a trade bill through the united states senate, through roadblocks every step of the way but we passed a trade bill that any country that has full access to the markets we are entitled to full access to their markets. now that means that we are going to stand tough for america and we are going to protect those jobs coming and we aren't a push american product
, university of texas was doing that, they have a law called the top 10% law which basically requires the school to admit the top 10% of high school students across the state. >> from any high school. >> from any high school across the state. so, this means that diversity on campus has increased enormously and actually is higher at about 25% than it was under racial preferences, at about 21%. and so, they were, they've put racial preferences on top of that. the question is whether this is necessary or appropriate. >> paul: since the gruter decision you had sandra day o'connor replaced by samuel alito and there could be a switch in the decision? >> certainly, and a good thing they are revisiting it, paul, because there's a growing body of evidence that racial preferences, not only don't help the intended beneficiary, which is poorer blacks, usually middle class kids, and might actually be hurting the kids who receive them and i say that, a mismatch of kids in schools. in california when they ended racial references, the black graduation rate increased and that's because more kids were
. there were people in legal law firm conference rom, they could get an internet connection. people in starbucks where they could get an internet connection. people working at the kitchen tables around town. and all of a sudden, right around april 1st. bestart moving to the headquarter. this is literally six week aways from the announcement. and this just this big space. bigger than the room. far bigger than the room. three or four times of the size of the room. it was a whole floor of the high-rise building in chicago, and it was just kind of remarkable. we didn't have everybody in. we were slowly bringing people in. literally we were still getting the servers up. we had telephones ringing and people try to answer phone calls. we had e-mail coming in to our e-mail address. we didn't have a system to receive e nail a real way that you would want. we had many coming many. we didn't have budgets. and we had, you know, we had constituency leaders calling our political department because they wanted to have time with the candidate, we had our fundraisers, who had to raise money with the
hope to appoint justices to the supreme court that will follow the law and the constitution and it would be my preference that they reverse roe v. wade. >> my preference that the people i put on the supreme court would overturn roe v. wade. >> those's a person romnian moment. he'd made it really clear. he wanted to be president. if you're going to follow the law and the constitution and upend roe v. wade, you can't do all three at once. physically impossible. but think going to your question, there's an interesting study by a project new america for mountain states, swing states of undecided voters, and predominantly they said these undecided voters were women. they believe strongtly in reproductive rights but they're also focused on the economy. the problem with making abortion sort of the single issue and the clear dividing line is i don't think every woman is pro-choice. people are more concerned with the economy than everything else so they're saying, all right, even if i'm personally pro-choice, is this the right -- how much is that going to be threatened right now and
this old house and senate which is unrepresentative with the what the country has just voted making laws you know that are contrary to what the new house and senate are going to do? i think most likely for all the fears and lord knows we will cover it on cable news, of a fiscal cliff my guess is just that they will put it off. >> and we do see the likelihood of a deal to make a deal as they are saying but there are two complications to that. there is one incentive for the markets day by day and there will be a lot of incentive to reassure the markets but the two, the two impediments to that, one the white house intends to play real hardball. they feel by putting it off, they loose their leverage and they do not plan to just extend all that, punk all that. there is going to be a fighter for that and second of president obama wins, paul ryan is going to be back in the house. he probably will be running for president in 2016. if paul ryan is back and running for president he is not going to want to make a deal that sees raising revenue, raising taxes and the conservatives will listen to him
still need this law. that is really unfortunate. host: willie in jacksonville, florida. independent. caller: good morning. with the lady that just called -- my thing is there must not be enough highly educated black institutions for black folks to keep saying i have to go to harvard to get my education, to stanford or something like that. i just do not understand. being black, we do not have the professors, at least the same criteria. to me, it seems like we are no further than we were before. we're still trying to get an education at your school. 500 years, and we do not have no qualified school on the same level with these schools and professors that is on the same level? see what i'm saying? host: here is bill powers, the 28 president of the university of texas, writing in today's "wall street journal." "history repeats itself wednesday in an eerie but ironic way." host: in the opinion in 2003 that adam liptak referred to, that justice sandra day o'connor wrote that the constitution -- host: that is sandra day o'connor, writing back in 2003. from rockville center, new york, a rep
at campaign finance from, as funders or as organizers expect the law to change again by the next cycle or the one after that? >> i don't think so. i think the supreme court has made very clear where it stands on citizens united, on money and politics but i think if anything the trend will probably accelerate in a few different ways, and they've been very -- i think he recently turned down a challenge, right, brad, on some aspect of citizens and re-emphasize no, we actually believe this. of course, we're entering an era where supreme court's don't really respect a president in the same way they used to so that if there are new justices added, if obama wins reelection and there are more democratic appointed judges commits very easy to imagine a fight for decision reversing or changing in some way. under the current course i think made very plain that your this is how, this their belief, this is the constitutional principle but they will keep applying it. i'm not aware but i'll see any evidence of a series reconsideration of the principal in citizens or think in speech now spent the supre
might address that gap. [laughter] there are six products of harvard law school and three products of yale law school on the supreme court. there are apparently no other law schools in the united states. [laughter] besides those two. no, it is a bizarre and unfortunately fact, i think. but those are, i hope, interesting facts about the supreme court. but frankly, i don't think they're very important. here's an important fact. about the supreme court. there are five republicans and four democrats. i will speak for somewhat longer, but this is basically all you need to know. [laughter] if be there's a takeaway here, i have gotten to the point early. there are five republicans and four democrats, and that really tells you much of what you need to know. and it is true that the justices wear robes because they're supposed to look all alike, and they're supposed to look, you know, it's supposed to give the perception that they're all pretty much the same, but just as on the other side of first street the united states congress is deeply divided according to party, so is the united states
claims that the south carolina law that requires voters to show photo id discriminate against minorities, since there is four weeks remain to election day. that law will not be allowed to go into effect until, however, next year. arguments in the supreme court case today could change affirmative action policies. shannon bream has the report. >> what we want? diversity. >> today, the supreme court was taxed with deciding just how far colleges and universities can go, if at all, when it comes to factoring rates into their admissions decision. abigail fisher said that she didn't get into the university of texas at austin, claiming that let's are qualified minorities were given preference over her simply because she is white. >> i hope that the court rules that as soon as race and ethnicity should not be a part of admission. reporter: as i understand their position, race is balanced against other issues, like socioeconomics, the strength of the classes people tell, it is never a standalone. >> we have made a great deal of progress on our campus and throughout the united states. >> something
change the law of the land on affirmative action. wyatt andrews was in the court today. >> reporter: abigail fisher was denied admission to the university of texas, she says, because of admission policies that favored less-qualified minorities. her simple argument is to stop using skin color in college admission. >> i hope the court rules that a student's race and ethnicity should not be considered when applying to the university of texas. >> reporter: the u.t. entering class is among the most diverse anywhere, roughly 50% white and 50% minority. by law, the school has to admit the top 10% of every high school class, regardless of race. but u.t. also uses what's called "holistic review," where race is separately considered with other factors, including leadership and family income. the university says that's legal under a 2003 ruling from justice sandra day o'connor. it allowed colleges to use race to find a critical mass of underrepresented minority students. but the court's conservative justices repeatedly asked when does the use of race end? liberal justice sonia sotomayor, defen
. they were passing right to work laws. they were receiving lots of funding for the federal government to build military installations at a time when the united states was involved in the cold war with the soviet union, so states like mississippi, states like georgia, texas, florida, southern california, arizona and north carolina are all being transformed in the post-world war ii period by this historic shift in population. just think about it. this period from 1964 to 2008 can be thought of this kind of the period of sunbelt dominance in the american presidential history. if you think about it, every president elected from 1964 to 2008 comes from a state of the sunbelt. lyndon johnson from texas, richard nixon from california, gerald ford was not even elected vice president. he was from michigan. jimmy carter from georgia, ronald reagan from california, the first george bush from texas and bill clinton from arkansas and the second bush from texas. so 2008 is in some ways a watershed election it's in being the four-year period of sunbelt dominance. there were issues that were critical
that the university of michigan law school, where they did use race in admission, had a lower level of -- they considered 14% to be a critical mass, much less than what the university of texas achieved through race-neutral means. i think this goes a long way to explaining why most observers think the supreme court is likely to strike down the use of race at the university of texas. the second question we take up, what should replace race-based affirmative action if it in fact is struck down by the u.s. supreme court? in a report, we look at nine states where, because of voter initiative or executive order or legislation, universities -- they did not give up on diversity and tried to find other ways of achieving racial and ethnic diversity. these plans were hardly perfect, but in many ways there are better than the old style of race-based affirmative action. you can see that in our analysis, six state street -- six states created partnerships with disadvantaged by schools to increase the pipeline of low- income and minority students. seven of the states provide class-based admission
of them think that i'm a fat person and say that we should pass laws preventing this kind of obesity, and create ways to federally subsidize weight-loss programs. who do they blame? they blame mcdonald's. why is that? because they sell delicious and fattening cheeseburgers and fries along with salads and mcnuggets an awful lot of other things, even the beloved happy meal is under assault. under assault by politicians all around the country and by some who call themselves scientists. one group of the very official sounding name, the center for science in the public interest, threatened to sue mcdonald's if they did not stop serving happy meals. they equated what mcdonald's was doing was child abuse and even worse, equated to child molestation. stephen gardner said in a prepared statement, he said it is a creepy and predatory practice that warrants an injunction. let's face it, it was gardner's statement that sounded creepy. the fact is that liberals hate mcdonald's and its competitors because they symbolize everything about america that they load. our entrepreneurial zero, a level of
to agree with you with their level of investments. >> second row on the side. >> after rule of law committee for the oceans, in the mid century, nicholas said geography was one of the most important factors in foreign affairs because it was the most permanent. this year we just saw the arctic icecap dropped another 750,000 square kilometers and appears to be opening more this session. what do you think this trend will mean not next year or even next decade but in a generation as that becomes more open for russia and canada in particular. >> nicholas pikeman is someone i devote a whole chapter to in this book because he is very provocative and here is the man who when it was unclear that china where defeat japan, predicted that china who is our ally at the time would become our adversary for geographical reasons and also said when europe was fighting for its life against germany, united europe could be a competitor for the united states. she was very clear volume. in terms of the arctic icecap, this is playing out over decades. if you had an arctic open for shipping and a close frie
campaign finance should be regulated, the current state of affairs is that the law is unclear and no one knows if the decisions will stand or get knocked down. it is insane, the wild west. it bodes poorly for us to understand what powers are at work. it is worth mentioning the stock act recently passed which will have new information for us to sink our teeth into a realm financial disclosures. financial transactions have to be disclosed monthly. there are certain things in their we worry about. that is a whole nother set of information. the third thing i want to mention is how political power functions. , the structure of the political dialogue. right now it is a mess. this is not the rules committee fault. in ways it is obama's fault. this is something to think about as you think about how the house works and what kind of tools we should build on the outside. when i look at the different categories of congressional information, it to the things we worked hard on, one is taking advantage of political pressures that exist. nonprofits would love to be able to create political pressure. we
and enforcement of environmental laws, the ban on the xl pipeline, the enforcement of labor laws -- those policies have killed thousands and thousands of jobs and collectively, we are making it incredibly difficult for small businesses to thrive, much less survive. >> so if you have 65% of spending going to individual payments, what would you do to try to reduce that? >> in order to create more jobs, we have to control the national debt. i think that is what we have to do. i have said it from the beginning. i have given a plan to try to deal with it. this idea that somehow mr. cruz is lecturing us on standing on our own feet, i find incredible. he spent most of your adult life working for the government. you have not created jobs. you have not on your own business. i have. my wife and i own a retail store. we did not have the federal government with their boots on our neck. when george bush was president, we lost 700,000 jobs per month. all these programs were in place at the time. the only addition is the health care act, which has not been fully implemented. i think that you have a selective mem
lost his job. the brennan center at nyu school of law has been thorough investigation at the idea of voter fraud. they say basically it doesn't exist. there've been 10 or 12 cases in the first 10 years of this century out of hundreds of millions of those spirits someone may register as mickey mouse, but mickey mouse never shows up in rows. but nevertheless, rove has initiated a cam pain and its allies in more than 30 states legislature of having votes requiring voter ids. now part of the democrats are saying this is a severe form of voter suppression. that is in many cases you find the elderly was given up their drivers licenses, but it's perfect years, the out they no longer have a government issued i.d., so they are not allowed to vote. you have minorities that is hispanic. one of the challenge is hispanic timebomb. now there'll be 70 million in 2020. if they start to vote on that, it's going to be curtains for the republican speakers 10 million hispanics in texas alone. states like texas and arizona will flip from red to blue very soon, when sakic said. so this is one thing the
changes have taken place to make it a little less stressful. a few because of the 2012 health care law. first there are more plans to pick from. second, women's coverage is getting better, and comparing health care plans should be easier. . >>> 's always worry about the safety of our kids especially when they play sports. with the rise of avoidable deaths among high school athletes some districts looking for ways to keep kids safer. in fairfax virginia they have assigned trainers at each school just in case of injury, looking for possible problem before they happen. >> there is an emergency action plan that coaches have for every facility that they are at, where they practice and as well as where they compete. >> we do our best to contact the parent pleadly on any injury to make sure they know what's coming home. >> the model in fairfax not cheap. it costs several millions a year but costs that protect their young athletes. >>> ahead of the curve, read up on the danger of sports injuries, we have it all on the website. special area on concussion. we have special sections dedicated t
in his campaign. he has been raising pac may, too. what you have to do is comply with the laws as they are, whether you're paying taxes were you are playing a football game. whether you like those laws are not, you comply with them. i have been for campaign reform and have pushed it very hard. i believe we have to do some things in that regard. but i have noticed that the senator of indiana has opposed the campaign reform and voted repeatedly against it. the things we have to do, i believe, that will cut back on soft money, for example, which i look on as frankly one of those things that we have had to do because the republicans have done it for so long. i think it is a loophole, frankly. but campaign reform, changing the rules of the game, is something that we tried repeatedly in this session of the congress, but only to have the republicans' lead the charge against the ndp does. i respect senator quayle would change his mind on that piece of legislation and give us the kind of campaign reform law that i think is needed in america. >> senator quayle, your response. >> senator
documents that were provided to the committee. >>> plus, more breaking news. another voter i.d. law temporarily blocked before the election. details on a judge's decision in south carolina today. >>> and join our conversation on twitter. you can find us. tell us what you think the pressure vice president biden and congressman ryan are under 24 hours before the debate. on every one of our cards there's a date. a reminder... that before this date, we have to exceed expectations. we have to find new ways to help make life easier, more convenient and more rewarding. it's the reason why we don't have costumers. we have members. american express. welcome in. yes, you do! don't! do! whoa, kitchen counselor here. see cascade complete pacs work like micro-scrubbing brushes to help power away tough foods even in corners and edges. hmm! cascade. love it or your money back. >>> no one in the administration has claimed to no all the answers. we have always made clear that we are giving the best information we have at the time. and that information has evolved. for example, if any administration
the panels are alive and well. >>guest: this entire health law is a death panel. it takes away care seniors need to stay alive taking the future medicare funding over the next decade by slashing what hospitals and dialysis centers and doctors and are paid to care for seniors. cuts to senior pay for more than half of the law and the entitlements for people under age 65, one example: hospitals will have $247 billion less money to care for the same number of seniors as as if the law did not pass so nurses will be spread thinner and wait if treatment and higher death rates. we know from the second evidence that seniors treated in low-spending hospitals have a 15 percent higher risk dying from the heart attack that brought them to the hospital. >>neil: 30 million more people coming into the system means people are going to be waiting for certain equipment, you name it. >>guest: but the cuts in this law will force 15 percent of hospitals to possibly stop taking medicare. where will the seniors go? almost half of hops will be forced to operate in the red providing skimpy care meaning lower surviva
protection of the law. >> reporter: the university automatically admits most of the students based upon their rank and high school class and one quarter of texas freshmen are admitted based upon a formula made up of many factors, one which of is race. bill powers said if the supreme court prevents that -- . >> we would not be given the kind of education to all of our students. we would prepare them to work and it would be a setback for our students and society. >> reporter: howard said diversity benefits all students but chief justice john roberts wanted to hon on you the -- know how the university would determine when it had, quote, a krill critical mass of diversity on campus. us judgeis kennedy could be a key swing vote appearing skeptical telling the texas delegation what you're saying is what counts is race above all. >> justice sodermayer said fisher's lawyer wants to, quote, gut the law. a decision in the fisher- university of texas case is not expected until spring. back to you. >> and thank you. >>>a panel of judges upheld south carolina's voter identification law requiring tho
-year associates in law firms, they make about the same. but women on average choose to work fewer hours than men even when they work full time. because, you know, full time is anything above 35 hours a week.r and women work about 12% i fewet hours. about 25% of women work part time. many women go in and out of the work force as they have children, and that on average reduces their average earnings,o but it doesn't mean that they're discriminated against. average s their average earnings, but it doesn't mean they are discriminated against. it doesn't mean if you take to women into men in the same job they don't earn the same. they do. >> what is the paycheck fairness act, and do you think it is necessary? >> the paycheck fairness act just was up again for a voting congress. it failed. it also failed when there was a democratic house senate and president and barack obama's first term. that's because it would require them to report to the government the women they have on their payroll, the men have on that there'll come how much they pay both groups. and that's an attempt of a government should tr
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